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Kepler 186F just 500 ly away..

By on March 23, 2015 6:53:20 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

maniakos

Join Date 03/2006
+15

http://themindunleashed.org/2015/02/scientists-discover-another-earth.html

It has no jovian giants protecting the planet so the planet won't be protected from asteroids.

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March 23, 2015 9:26:41 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Space has always interested me. Though it also makes me sad.

Interesting because the possibilities are literally endless. Sad because I know that I live in a time period (most likely all of us do), in which we won't even begin to experience those possibilities.

It's both an exciting and depressing reality for me. We see all of these fiction shows where people imagine humanity traveling to the furthest stars and encountering all kinds of strange and wonderful things. But of course, that kind of thing is outside the realm of current possibility. The technology just isn't there, and may very well never be.

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March 24, 2015 9:10:30 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Quoting Kevin_Walter,

Space has always interested me. Though it also makes me sad.

Interesting because the possibilities are literally endless. Sad because I know that I live in a time period (most likely all of us do), in which we won't even begin to experience those possibilities.

It's both an exciting and depressing reality for me. We see all of these fiction shows where people imagine humanity traveling to the furthest stars and encountering all kinds of strange and wonderful things. But of course, that kind of thing is outside the realm of current possibility. The technology just isn't there, and may very well never be.

 

Same here Kevin, my three favorite movies are all sci-fi, The Abyss, Contact and now Interstellar too. But I too know I will never experience those possibilities. Most people for instance would be in fear of or draw weapons on a UFO and it's occupants should they ever encounter one for instance. Not me though, I would look at them and say "Come here so we can communicate and be friends."

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May 17, 2015 7:12:40 AM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

That was a nice read, thanks for the link. I wonder if they are able to determine if such a planet has an electo-magnetic field intact which would be able to shield the soil from solar winds and cosmic radiation?

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May 26, 2015 3:21:05 PM from Elemental Forums Elemental Forums

And only 500 light years away.... a close neighbor...

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May 27, 2015 7:23:06 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Just 500ly away - I'll pop over this afternoon

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May 27, 2015 7:50:58 AM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting Kevin_Walter,

Space has always interested me. Though it also makes me sad.

Interesting because the possibilities are literally endless. Sad because I know that I live in a time period (most likely all of us do), in which we won't even begin to experience those possibilities.

It's both an exciting and depressing reality for me. We see all of these fiction shows where people imagine humanity traveling to the furthest stars and encountering all kinds of strange and wonderful things. But of course, that kind of thing is outside the realm of current possibility. The technology just isn't there, and may very well never be.

 

I dunno how old or young you are ... but I already have seen a radical shift in our experience of the universe, by the mere advent of the age of exoplanet discovery.  I grew up on Carl Sagan.  I was very bright-eyed at the prospect of finding other worlds around distant stars, but ... it was still just a dream, a hypothesis.  It seemed reasonable, but we had no evidence ..... and now we do.  And that's amazing!

 

That's not to say I'm not sorely disappointed we've lost the fire for space exploration.  We could have had a manned mission to Mars over and done with by now, but instead we elect politicians only interested in keeping their wealthy benefactors wealthy, and finding impoverished people in far-off lands to bomb. :/  It isn't a matter of we couldn't do it because we don't have the technology, we could have had it decades ago.  We have more than enough resources to do it .... but we have to change our leaders to get there.  Keep electing the same idiots, we'll keep grinding our gears in space.

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May 27, 2015 7:22:33 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Space Explorations will more and more shift into private sectors so, over time, the political influence (or lack of it) will become insignificant. The basic problem with a Mars expedition is to get the crew back home. The question also remains of why it is so important for man to land there, when a robot can do some of the jobs equally and at that, much cheaper.

Space is so vast that it is very likely that there are other terran type planets in which we could possibly live or find other lifeforms etc, but we might never actually go there because the distances are simply too great even when viewed under lightspeed setting (and for massive objects to accelerate to this is downright impossible), and most parts of the universe is actually flying away from our location.

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July 23, 2015 4:38:30 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

And now this:

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-kepler-mission-discovers-bigger-older-cousin-to-earth

Apparently we have discovered Stellar Cartography. That should mean it's just a few more turns until we get Hyperdrive...

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July 24, 2015 1:37:51 PM from Elemental Forums Elemental Forums

Quoting Petri Kokko,

And now this:

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-kepler-mission-discovers-bigger-older-cousin-to-earth

Apparently we have discovered Stellar Cartography. That should mean it's just a few more turns until we get Hyperdrive...

 

Only if you chose it as a research project.  Maybe researching black holes, or super grains might get the research point allotment?   

 

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July 27, 2015 8:00:11 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Let the Gremlins do it.

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July 27, 2015 8:39:06 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Chibiabos, you've been here long enough to know most of us are older.  I grew up watching Carl Sagan.  That camera they sent to Pluto years ago is sending back pictures.  Had a show on 15 July, was great.  Sure wish they make Pluto a planet again like it was when I was in school.

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July 27, 2015 3:33:43 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Sure wish they make Pluto a planet again

Then we must make at least Eris a planet, too, and probably Haumea, Makemake, Ceres, 2007-OR-10, Sedna, and Quaoar as well. Plus the 10,000 or so other similar bodies that we haven't found yet but probably are there.

Mind you, I am not against labeling them all planets. The current definition is a bit artificial and smacks of tendentiousness. It'd be more logical to just use a simpler definition and drop the orbit clearing rule. Our solar system would then have "as many planets as it happens to have" and if that number turns out to be huge then it turns out to be huge and that's it. After all, we are supposed to make our theory first and then check it against reality.

It's just that I can understand the argument for having two categories of planets in order to limit the number of the "major" ones, too. Even if the line we draw between normal-sized and dwarf-sized ones happens to be somewhat arbitrary.

But in any case we should be rational and consistent with our definitions. If we want to define Pluto a planet then we must accept any similar object by that definition a Planet, too.

In the mean time you can take comfort in the thought that Pluto is not just any old dwarf-planet but the title-body to a whole class of dwarf-planets: the Plutoids.

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July 27, 2015 3:56:02 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Well, if you think about it, we are more than likely the new folks when it comes to space exploration and as such we should realize that objects we are now seeing for the first time have all ready been name awhile ago.  Surely you don't think we are the first to have applied names to the planets, or maybe you do.  

Certainly something to take time out to think about. 

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July 27, 2015 9:52:05 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

a good reason to make not make Pluto a planet is so kids don't. Have to memorize 3008 names for planets in school. Pluto has not cleared it's. Neighborhood. Their are thousands of objects like it in our solar system. It is a dual planet in a sense it orbits around the same center of gravity with five other objects that go around the sun. It's way smaller than our own moon.

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